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Hudeshope

 

Landscape photo of Hudeshope

Hudeshope

Photo (C) Steve Crowe

 

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Low Carrs
Monk's Moor


Situation and Character
This venue is a collection of boulders and small edges in two locations on Middleton Common. Standing at the top of Monk’s Moor, an area of moorland situated north-east of Middleton-in-Teesdale and nearby above and behind Coldberry Mine workshops. Although the rocks are small they comprise of good quality Gritstone but, as no brushing was undertaken during the development, it is still a little lichenous in places. The problems have been graded as of their current state. Landings are variable in quality and generally a mat would be sensible. The outlook, which encompasses the High Pennines, is superb and, given the westerly aspect. So far the obvious lines have given easier or mid-grade problems but the potential for harder variations (especially traverses) suggests some interest for those seeking greater technicality. A walk across the moor of about thirty minutes duration connects the two sites.
 

History

Long before climbers explored Hudeshope the valley it was exploited for its minerals. The most prosperous period of lead mining spanned almost the whole of the nineteenth century, creating one of the largest mine complexes of the North Pennines. This industry transformed forever the landscape of Hudeshope Valley. Scattered around the valley are numerous mine entrances and associated buildings that suggest the extent of the intricate system of shafts and levels that exist below the surface. On the valley sides are reservoirs and the remnants of a man-made water system that was used to power the mine machinery. Coldberry Gutter, the largest hush in the North Pennines, cuts through Hardberry Hill to form a distinctive scar on the horizon that can be seen from miles around.


Alan Dougherty and Kevin Flint visited in late July 2005, when the first problems were ascended and recorded. Three subsequent visits, during August of that year, by Carol and Alan Dougherty, resulted in the discovery of further problems. Steve Crowe and Karin Magog soloed all the lines that Alan had just top roped in 2006. Simon Huthwaite added The Noodle in April 2015.

 

Access
Excepting the month of September, areas of land at the head of Hudeshope are subject to access restrictions under the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000. This is for conservation reasons; primarily because the area is an important habitat for Black Grouse. These restrictions mean that for most of the year the previously suggested access routes to Low Carrs and Monk’s Moor need to be modified:
 

Low Carrs
At the eastern head of Hudeshope a Public Footpath sign will be found where the road turns sharply. The path leaves the road at GR 954292. Follow it up the spoil heap to meet an access track which is followed until it splits at GR 955294. Take the right-hand track (which is the line of the Public Footpath). Pass through a boundary gate at GR 956294 and follow the wall northwards until it meets another wall at GR 955299. At this point cross the boundary with care and follow the moor wall north-west to the crag.
 


Monk’s Moor
At the eastern head of Hudeshope a Public Footpath sign will be found where the road turns sharply. The path leaves the road at GR 954292. Follow it up the spoil heap to meet an access track which is followed until it splits at GR 955294. Take the right-hand track (which is the line of the Public Footpath). Pass through a boundary gate and continue until GR959297, at which point another gate should be seen in the fence to the right. Aim for the gate and follow the shooters’ track south-east towards the obvious Monk’s Currick.


Download the Hudeshope MiniGuide as a PDF.

 

 

Open Access land in the North Pennies

 

Access to these crags is very delicate so please observe local signs and follow the Moorland Visitor’s Code:

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Be safe - plan ahead and follow any signs

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Keep dogs under close control

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Prevent uncontrolled moorland fires

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Protect plants and animals, and take your litter home

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Leave gates and property as you find them

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Consider other people